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Imagine that you have a hollow spherical conductor carrying a net charge \(\displaystyle +Q\) that has inner radius \(\displaystyle R_1\) and outer radius \(\displaystyle R_2\). Now imagine again that you threw a point charge, \(\displaystyle +Q/2\), at the center of the sphere. Find the potential as a function of \(\displaystyle r\), the distance from the center, for \(\displaystyle 0
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Why do you think? Did you answer my question? Thread closed. -Dan
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topsquark said: I know all that. What do you know? Give, or I'm closing the thread. -Dan Click to expand... Why are you upset, Dan?
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george357 said: Just a warming up. \(\displaystyle \Delta V = \int dE\) Click to expand... I know all that. What do you know? Give, or I'm closing the thread. -Dan
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Just a warming up. \(\displaystyle \Delta V = \int dE\)
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george357 said: Imagine that you have a hollow spherical conductor carrying a net charge \(\displaystyle +Q\) that has inner radius \(\displaystyle R_1\) and outer radius \(\displaystyle R_2\). Now imagine again that you threw a point charge, \(\displaystyle +Q/2\), at the center of the sphere. Find the potential as a function of \(\displaystyle r\), the distance from the center, for \(\displaystyle 0
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CaptainBlack said: Take this to the Physics Help Forum. Click to expand... Believe me or not, once you see the electric field formula, you will say it is a pure calculus. Don't let physics symbols scares you, it is just a fancy way to talk about mathematics.
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george357 said: Imagine that you have a hollow spherical conductor carrying a net charge \(\displaystyle +Q\) that has inner radius \(\displaystyle R_1\) and outer radius \(\displaystyle R_2\). Now imagine again that you threw a point charge, \(\displaystyle +Q/2\), at the center of the sphere. Find the potential as a function of \(\displaystyle r\), the distance from the center, for \(\displaystyle 0
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